Creating with Crayola

Searching for inspiration for my next project, I stumbled upon Bloomingdale’s display of garments made from Crayola crayons. Designers ranging from Nanette Lepore to Rebecca Minkoff used these childhood coloring tool to create beautiful, monochromatic looks. After realizing the amount of crayons I would need for a full-blown crayon garment, I decided to use them only the bodice. Sifting through the studio and old crafts, I was able to find plenty of blue crayons, in a series of shades.

© Mary Kate Donahue, 2015

After sewing a simple, strapless bodice and a full skirt from navy blue satin, I began to attach a myriad of blue crayons onto the gown. With only a few hot glue burns, I created the crayon dress, more formally know as “Color Me Blue.”

© Mary Kate Donahue, 2015

  On an exciting note, I was pleased to find out that this gown received recognition in my school’s art show. First place in the 3-D portion, the crayon dress has proven to be a favorite of many. Who knows what my next project in the studio will be!!

© Mary Kate Donahue, 2015

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A Million Dresses In One

My latest creation shouldn’t just be within the pages of Vogue, but it’s made of the pages from Vogue! A dear friend of mine asked if I would be willing to make a dress for her to wear to our winter formal. After brainstorming, we decided to craft the garment our of Vogue magazines! Although this project posed many difficulties and was extremely time-consuming, it was so worth it.

© Mary Kate Donahue, 2015

© Mary Kate Donahue, 2015

© Mary Kate Donahue, 2015

© Mary Kate Donahue, 2015

I began by sewing a simple strapless, A-line dress out of a sturdy cotton. Then, I spent hours upon hours cutting models, designers, shoes, bags, and more out of the pages of Vogue. I carefully decoupaged the pieces on the bodice, and then arranged the millions of models on the skirt of the dress. To complete the look, I crafted a belt with notable designers’ names covering it.

© Mary Kate Donahue, 2015

© Mary Kate Donahue, 2015

© Mary Kate Donahue, 2015

© Mary Kate Donahue, 2015

© Mary Kate Donahue, 2015

© Mary Kate Donahue, 2015

After making several alterations and perfected the unique creation, Catherine Mary wore the fabulous dress to our winter formal! Pairing the bold garment with a chunky diamond necklace and red pumps completed her look. In many ways, last night was my debut as “designer” for MKDesigns (a company name I created for my Portfolio Development class). Catherine Mary received an unprecedented amount of compliments for her ensemble, and I was unbelievably proud to hear her say “I’m wearing Mary Kate Donahue.”

© Mary Kate Donahue, 2015

© Mary Kate Donahue, 2015

© Mary Kate Donahue, 2015

© Mary Kate Donahue, 2015

Hopefully, Anna Wintour would approve.

A Very Merry Monogrammed Christmas

Santa sure knows the way to my heart…through those three little letters that I call my own! From necklaces and earrings to sweatshirts, I found several monogrammed items under the tree. More importantly, I found a monogramming machine! Words cannot begin to describe how surprised I was to find such a fabulous gift.

©  Mary Kate Donahue, 2014

© Mary Kate Donahue, 2014

I first learned to sew from my mother, and I’ve loved it ever since. For as long as I can remember all my Halloween costumes and sisters’ matching Easter dresses have been handmaid by my mother on our 30 year old sewing machine. Therefore, she decided it was time to upgrade our machine…and why not chose one with a monogramming capability?!

©  Mary Kate Donahue, 2014

© Mary Kate Donahue, 2014

©  Mary Kate Donahue, 2014

© Mary Kate Donahue, 2014

The Brother SE400 is the perfect fit for those who want a great bang for their buck. This budget-friendly sewing and embroidery machine cannot do everything, but that’s totally fine with my mother and I. Whether it’s hemming a pair of my father’s pants or adding a simple monogram to a handtowel, the Brother SE400 is perfect for us!

©  Mary Kate Donahue, 2014

© Mary Kate Donahue, 2014

As the fashionista and monogram-queen of my household, I have already taken over the machine and used to to personalize anything and everything in sight. Unfortunately, the Brother SE400 did not come with any monogram fonts included, so I decided to purchase my favorites online (http://www.8clawsandapaw.com). Since then, I’ve spent all waking hours in the basement spicing up headbands, pillowcases, undies, and beyond! Keep your eye our for some DIY projects from the fashionista and may your 2015 be filled with happiness, peace, and monograms!

DIY Canvases

It’s that time…put your hair in a ponytail, change into your grubby old clothes, and channel your inner artist. Let’s craft!!!

I’m not the most artistic person, but I do consider myself a pretty creative thinker. I can imagine these elaborate and super creative ideas in my mind, but when it comes to executing them perfectly (because there is simply no other way), I get frustrated. This time, I was patient and came up with simple yet adorable ideas.

Welcome to craft city!

IMG_7090

© Mary Kate Donahue, 2013

IMG_7098

© Mary Kate Donahue, 2013

From left to right, the following is a brief description of each canvas.

Lilly Pulitzer canvas: I printed out several Lilly Pulitzer prints and cut them into small squares. Using ModPodge, I glued them in a patchwork fashion onto the canvas. Once dry, I took a paint pen and wrote this amazing Lilly quote!

Anchor canvas: First, I painted the background of the canvas turquoise. Then, I printed out a large anchor and taped it onto the canvas. Using a Sharpie, I traced the anchor onto the canvas. Taking a periwinkle paint, I filled in my tracing of the anchor. To finish it off, I took deep blue paint (and a steady hand) to write the quote.

Chevron canvas: Taking 2 inch pieces on masking tape, I arranged them in a chevron pattern 1 inch away from each other. Once the taping was done, I simply painted the canvas green. Then removing the tape, I had a pretty nice version of chevron. To complete the canvas, I took neon pink paint to the edges.

Monogram canvas: Again using tape, I sectioned off three equal parts of the canvas and painted each one a different color- blue, orange and pink. Then, I generated my monogram on MicrosoftWord, printed it out, and cut it to be a nice circle. Then, using ModPodge, I secured my monogram to the canvas.

Viola!