Seamless Fashion: Prime Wardrobe

From food to fashion, Amazon has done it again. After announcing their purchase of Whole Foods last week, Amazon quickly introduced another new component to their growing empire— Prime Wardrobe.

Amazon capitalized on the main reasons many consumers do not purchase clothing online- fit and sizing issues, complicated returns and hefty shipping fees. By eliminating all these risks, Amazon Wardrobe appears to be seamless. According to Amazon, the service will include products from brands outside their private label, such as Calvin Klein, Levi’s, adidas, Parker, Milly and Theory, among others.

Aside from clothing, shoes and accessories delivered directly to your door, Prime Wardrobe includes other unique features. According to Lauren Thomas of CNBC, there is “no upfront charge,” and customers only pay for the products they keep. In addition, Nick Wingfield of The New York Times reports that “customers can return the items they don’t want in a resealable box with the preprinted shipping label that the order came in.” As another component of Prime Wardrobe, discounts are central to the service. Wingfield shares that Amazon will offer “10 percent off the purchase price of an order for anyone who keeps three to four items, and 20 percent off for anyone who keeps five or more items.”

Although I personally value and thoroughly enjoy the process of shopping in-store, the introduction of Prime Wardrobe has certainly peaked my interest. Often, I purchase clothing from local department stores and boutiques, but take them home to try on with my own undergarments, shoes and jewelry and assess if I truly will wear the item. If Prime Wardrobe provides me with that same experience but eliminates my time spent shopping in-store and the hassle of returning to a physical location, I may become a convert. I cannot say definitively, but it may not be too long until Amazon delivers my first Prime Wardrobe order.


Works Cited

“Prime Wardrobe.” Amazon, Amazon.com, Inc. amazon.com. Accessed 26 June 2017.

Thomas, Lauren. “Amazon announces Prime Wardrobe, tackling fashion retail head on.” CNBC, CNBC LLC. 20 June 2017. cnbc.com. Accessed 26 June 2017.

Wingfield, Nick. “Amazon Will Let Customers Try On Clothes Before Buying.” The New York Times, The New York Times Company. 20 June 2017. nytimes.com. Accessed 26 June 2017.

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