Seamless Fashion: Prime Wardrobe

From food to fashion, Amazon has done it again. After announcing their purchase of Whole Foods last week, Amazon quickly introduced another new component to their growing empire— Prime Wardrobe.

Amazon capitalized on the main reasons many consumers do not purchase clothing online- fit and sizing issues, complicated returns and hefty shipping fees. By eliminating all these risks, Amazon Wardrobe appears to be seamless. According to Amazon, the service will include products from brands outside their private label, such as Calvin Klein, Levi’s, adidas, Parker, Milly and Theory, among others.

Aside from clothing, shoes and accessories delivered directly to your door, Prime Wardrobe includes other unique features. According to Lauren Thomas of CNBC, there is “no upfront charge,” and customers only pay for the products they keep. In addition, Nick Wingfield of The New York Times reports that “customers can return the items they don’t want in a resealable box with the preprinted shipping label that the order came in.” As another component of Prime Wardrobe, discounts are central to the service. Wingfield shares that Amazon will offer “10 percent off the purchase price of an order for anyone who keeps three to four items, and 20 percent off for anyone who keeps five or more items.”

Although I personally value and thoroughly enjoy the process of shopping in-store, the introduction of Prime Wardrobe has certainly peaked my interest. Often, I purchase clothing from local department stores and boutiques, but take them home to try on with my own undergarments, shoes and jewelry and assess if I truly will wear the item. If Prime Wardrobe provides me with that same experience but eliminates my time spent shopping in-store and the hassle of returning to a physical location, I may become a convert. I cannot say definitively, but it may not be too long until Amazon delivers my first Prime Wardrobe order.


Works Cited

“Prime Wardrobe.” Amazon, Amazon.com, Inc. amazon.com. Accessed 26 June 2017.

Thomas, Lauren. “Amazon announces Prime Wardrobe, tackling fashion retail head on.” CNBC, CNBC LLC. 20 June 2017. cnbc.com. Accessed 26 June 2017.

Wingfield, Nick. “Amazon Will Let Customers Try On Clothes Before Buying.” The New York Times, The New York Times Company. 20 June 2017. nytimes.com. Accessed 26 June 2017.

Advertisements

A Maxxinsta’s Delight

While shifts in consumer tastes and technological advancements have reinvented the face of retail, we are certainly not in a “retail apocalypse,” contrary to popular belief. According to Mark Matthews of the National Retail Federation, “the narrative that retail is struggling — or even dying — is significantly overblown.” Furthermore, one retailer in particular is consistently thriving— T.J. Maxx.

Processed with VSCO with hb1 preset

Mary Kate Donahue, 2017.

As a self-proclaimed Maxxinsta, I believe that I may be partially responsible for T.J. Maxx’s continued prosperity. According to Fox Business’s Suzanne Kapner, T.J. Maxx relies on creating a “constant treasure hunt.” By rapidly turning over merchandise, T.J. Maxx is able to capture the consumer and keep them coming back. Personally, I frequent the T.J. Maxx closest to my home once a week, or every two/three weeks when I’m trying to watch my wallet. To uphold Kapner’s point, the uncertainty and thrill of searching through the merchandise is one of the reasons I enjoy shopping at T.J. Maxx.

Low prices— another ingredient in T.J. Max’xs recipe for success. After purchasing a pair of Jack Rogers for $60, a Rebecca Minkoff bag for $99 and a Trina Turk bikini for $40, T.J. Maxx has set a standard for me. Knowing that I can find designer items for half the retail price at T.J. Maxx makes me less likely to ever pay full price from the original source, hence why I have become loyal to T.J. Maxx.

Who does T.J. Maxx attribute majority of its success to? According to Kapner, it’s their buyers, as “each buyer controls millions of dollars and has authority to cut deals on the spot, unlike most department stores, which can take weeks to review and approve orders.” After intensive training for several years, T.J. Maxx buyers are given an immense amount of responsibility yet freedom to bring sellable merchandise into the stores.

T.J. Maxx currently operates “3,800 physical locations and plans to open 250 stores this year,” as cited by Kapner. Even in the dawn of the e-commerce age, T.J. Maxx (and similar retailers, such as Marshalls, Saks Off 5th, etc.) still reap the benefits of a unique, bargain business model. Clearly, Maxxinstas everywhere are rejoicing.


Works Cited

Kapner, Suzanne. “How T.J. Maxx is Bucking the Crisis in Retailing.” FOX Business, FOX News Network, LLC. 20 June 2017. foxbusiness.com. Accessed 25 June 2017.

Matthews, Mark. “Retail’s Reinvention Story Is Just Getting Started.” The National Retail Federation, National Retail Federation. 14 June 207. nrf.com. Accessed 25 June 2017.

The Evolution of Carrie Bradshaw

As I relax on vacation and binge watch numerous episodes of Sex & The City, I am reminded of Carrie Bradshaw’s complete style evolution during each of the six seasons and the two films from 1998 to 2010.

giphy.gif

From a tight 90s cocktail dress in Season 1 to a pair of skinny denim jeans in Season 6, Bradshaw certainly fell victim to the time’s evolving trends. However, some things never changed for Bradshaw- her oversized fur coat, her beloved collection of Manolo Blannik shoes and her curly locks. Take a look at some of Bradshaw’s most memorable ensembles from each season of Sex & The City, as well as the two films.

Screen Shot 2017-06-17 at 9.17.51 PM

Screen Shot 2017-06-17 at 9.18.11 PM

Screen Shot 2017-06-17 at 9.18.44 PM

Screen Shot 2017-06-17 at 9.19.05 PM

Screen Shot 2017-06-17 at 9.19.55 PM

Screen Shot 2017-06-17 at 9.20.20 PM

Screen Shot 2017-06-17 at 9.20.42 PM

Screen Shot 2017-06-17 at 9.22.19 PM